What is a “Bee City”?

By Suzanne Seryck, Master Gardener

beecitycanIn the summer of 2017 the City of Kawartha Lakes was officially recognized as a Bee City by Bee City Canada. I live in Lindsay and heard this first through our local newsletter last summer. Since then I attended our local horticultural meeting in January and heard Susan Blayney, who had spearheaded the project, give an interesting and enthusiastic talk on what exactly this means to the City of Kawartha Lakes and how a city can officially become a Bee City.

Pollinators are vital. They are responsible for 1 in every 3 bites of food that we eat, as well as the reproduction of 90% of the world’s wild life plant species. The approach of Bee City Canada is to bring first nations, cities, campuses, schools and communities together to promote and protect pollinators, encouraging a natural, pollinator friendly approach to gardening and farming, where ecology is respected and biodiversity is the goal.

Bee City Canada was launched in Canada in 2016 by Shelly Candel after being inspired bnature-3240902_640y the success of Bee City USA. Bee City USA is a non-profit organization, which was started in 2012 to help motivate communities to sustain pollinators. There are currently 62 cities and 33 campuses or educational institutes recognized through Bee City U.S.A.

The official vision of Bee City Canada is ‘Communities across Canada, connected in the protection, promotion and celebration of pollinators, enjoying the benefits of healthy ecosystems’. The first city to be recognized by Bee City Canada was Toronto in 2016, and since then 10 additional cities, 8 schools and 3 businesses have been recognized. The City of Kawartha Lakes is the first municipality to be recognized, and is unique for both its size and its agricultural component.

lavender-1537694_640The City of Kawartha Lakes has a number of initiatives that they are working towards, the largest being the Fenelon Falls Pollinator project. Last year, a 1.5 acre decommissioned parcel of land on the Fenelon Falls landfill site was reseeded with a pollinator friendly seed mix. This project is an ongoing pilot that is being monitored by students from Fleming College along with the Ministry of the Environment. Other initiatives that are being planned include pollinator gardens, a 100 garden challenge, education in schools and seed bombing along trails, roads and parks.

It is important for all of us to recognize how necessary pollinators are, and to do whatever we can to encourage and support them. For anyone with a garden, we can all create pollinator friendly spaces, growing plants that will provide food, creating shelter, leaving space undisturbed for pollinators to build nests in the soil and creating a safe, pesticide free environment.

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